November 12, 2018 • 0 comment(s)
Let me start by saying, I wish I didn’t have to raise them. I know my products are an investment and I wish I could continue to provide them at the current price. Actually I wish I could lower the prices to make them more accessible to more people. But the truth is, I just can’t afford to. I’m hoping to grow food for my community until I’m no longer physically able and at these prices I will be out of business long before then. I could cut corners and reduce costs in doing so, but I am not willing to do that to my animals or to you. Rhode Island. What a great state, right? I absolutely love it here. It also happens to be the state with the most expensive farmland in the country and it really lacks infrastructure when it comes to livestock farming. When I recently visited a few farmer’s markets in New Hampshire I learned that those farms are literally paying half for grain what I’m paying here and also have multiple options for slaughterhouses within an hour of their farm. They can purchase a whole farm for a few hundred thousand dollars. Their prices are the same as mine. As many of you probably know I drive three hours each way to bring my animals to humane slaughter in Vermont. That’s six hours of driving to bring the animals up, and six hours of driving to go back to pick up the meat. Not only is that an incredible amount of my time, but it’s a huge gas expense, and a lot of wear and tear on the vehicles and my trailer. Although there is an option much closer to home, I am not willing to cut corners with my animals.
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November 12, 2018 • 0 comment(s)
First things first, what is a stewing hen? Good question. Laying hens have a laying life of about two years before their production drops to the point where they are no longer a productive member of the flock. Aka, it’s much too expensive to feed them for the amount of eggs they’re laying. And so after two years of eating grass and bugs and driving around in the eggmobile, a Deep Roots Farm laying hen becomes a stewing hen. And on goes the ever-present cycle of life on the farm. Because stewing hens have a longer time on earth than their cousins, the broilers, their meat has a much different profile. First, they are much more lean since they’ve been chasing bugs for two years, and they have a much richer, golden fat from years of pasture. What this means is that roasting a laying hen like a normal broiler chicken will have disastrous results, but slow cooking a stewing hen and making soup will result in the best chicken soup you’ve ever had with the most beautiful and delicious golden broth you’ve ever seen.
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