November 12, 2018 • 0 comment(s)
Summer came like a freight train last week. If I'm being perfectly honest, I turn into a bit of a waste of a human when the thermometer hovers near 90. And just when I thought the heat wave was over, here we are again. Today's 91 degrees felt like a perfect opportunity to come inside and share a delicious recipe with all of you. Last week I arrived to my boyfriend's house desperately hungry. It had been quite a busy day and I had forgotten to eat lunch. Faced with the decision of whether to go for ice cream or have him make something at home, I left it up to him. I was too hungry to make any decisions. "How about "Garlic Scape and Sundried Tomato pesto pasta?" he suggested. I wasn't sure I could wait for something so fancy but I didn't want to seem like too much of a hungry monster, so I agreed. About twelve minutes later, there was one of the most delicious meals I've ever had sitting in front of me. Sundried Tomato and Garlic Scape Pesto Pasta Ingredients 1/2 bunch Garlic Scapes 1 jar -or homemade-of Sundried Tomatoes, drained 1/4 cup pine nuts (or walnuts or sunflower seeds) 1/4 cup Olive Oil Salt to taste 1 lb pasta Pecorino or Parmesan Cheese 1 lb Deep Roots Farm Italian Sausage Steps Heat cast iron pan and cook sausage. Boil water for pasta. While waiting for the boil, combine garlic scapes, sundried tomatoes, pine nuts, olive oil, and salt into a blender. Blend on low or pulse until a chunky paste has formed. Cook pasta to directions on box. Mix pesto into cooked pasta, add slices sausage, and top with fresh cheese. Serve and enjoy!
Read more...
November 12, 2018 • 0 comment(s)
Start somewhere and then become better. My first batch of pigs, I bucket watered from a river during the winter. I carried the buckets up a little hill, over the driveway, and then had to lift them over a gate that was almost shoulder height and pour the water through a smallish hole at the top of my waterer. When the pigs were bigger, they were drinking almost 80 gallons per day. I will never do that again. BUT, it worked while it had to. I absolutely hate inefficiency and go through my days thinking of all the ways I could be more efficient. But becoming more efficient tends to also cost money so I’m learning to take baby steps and be happy with the small time savings. I will always be learning. This is perhaps my favorite part of being a farmer. The more you know, the less you know. Every year, every day even, I will continue to learn as long as I keep farming. I will learn more about the soil, more about the animals I’m raising, more about business, more about myself. Don’t wait too long to start the grazing season.
Read more...

Your Cart